Where to eat in Leavenworth with your dog

Where to eat in Leavenworth with your dog

No… not where to eat your dog! Where to eat WITH your dog. There are a limited number dining options in Leavenworth if you have your four footed friend along. All of them have outdoor patios, so they may not be pleasant places to eat about 75% of the time. Please update the list below if you know any more!

Argonaut Coffee – Espresso and Coffee

Der Hinterhof – Beer Hall with BBQ food

Fresh Burger Cafe – Gourmet burgers plus more

Munchen Haus – Premium sausages

The South – Urban bar food with a Latin flavor. GMO free and wholesome

Uncle Uli’s Pub – No menu

Scavenger Hunt for Seattle, Washington

Are you bringing visitors from out of town who are looking to explore Seattle? Do you have a weekend looking for something to fill it up and have hit all the tourist places? How about a scavenger hunt for Seattle? Clues are above, answers are below.

Scavenger Hunt for Seattle, Washington

1.) Q: World’s Grossest place

2.) Q: Where milk goes bad

3.) Q: The Future was born here

4.) Q: 1906 Books

5.) Q: They watch over you

6.) Q: Where the city was born, and died

7.) Q: Hammers all day

8.) Q: Cars and Pedestrians coexist

9.) Q: Raven, Shaman, Frog, Bear, Eagle, Whale, Eagle

10.) Q: Friendship of Asia

11.) Q: Swimming in steam

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1.) A: Bubble Gum Wall

2.) A: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese

3.) A: Seattle Center

4.) A: Seattle Central Library

5.) A: Gargoyles (Multiple locations)

6.) A: Arch of the Burke Building. Formerly the location of A.A. Denny’s Residence, a founder of Seattle. After that the Great Fire of 1889m started here.

7.) A: “Hammering Man” at Seattle Art Museum

8.) A: Freeway Park

9.) A: Totem Pole in Pioneer Square

10.) A: Yosoji Kobayashi Friendship Bell, Washington State Convention & Trade Center

11.) A: Orca Mural on the Seattle Steam Plant.

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Hope you enjoyed the Scavenger Hunt for Seattle. If you have any additions, please comment about them below! Also be sure to check out the Scavenger Hunt for Portland.

Socialist Colony of Glennis Washington

Name: Glennis
Class: A5
GPS: Unknown
Directions: Two different resources have different locations for this one. Trying Home by Justin Wadland[zotpressInText item=”GCZAW7EH” format=”%num%”] says that it’s location was twenty seven miles outside of Tacoma in the Cascade foothills. The Harbor History Museum Blog has a more exact location, “located on 160 acres near Clear Lake on the Eatonville Road, 17 miles south of Tacoma, Washington.” This would put the location somewhere in the vicinity of Northwest Trek Wildlife Park.

Description:
Glennis was inspired by the book Looking Backward, 2000-1887 by journalist Edward Bellamy. The book describes a utopia society in the year 2000 where the Government has taken over all industry. Everyone receives an education before serving in the “Industrial Army.” Workers received the same amount regardless of work and all comforts were provided for equally.

In its day the book was highly influential among the upper-middle class. Over two hundred thousand copies were sold by the end of 1889. It sparked the Nationalism Movement that swept the US. In 1891 one hundred and sixty five Nationalist clubs were formed to discuss the book and it’s ideals.

The Glennis Coorperation Industrial Company was founded on May 5, 1894 to “own and operate manufactories, to acquire land, to build houses for it’s employees; to insure the employees against want, or the fear of want; and to maintain harmonious social relationships on the basis of cooperation.” William Reed and Oliver Verity donated 160 acres (a quarter section of a land claim,) to fill the acquire land portion of that mission statement. Membership quickly grew from eight to thirty adults who cleared the land, planted gardens and built the communities buildings. Each adult member paid fifty dollars to join the experimental community.

Unfortunately problems arose in the second year. The community is about 1000 feet above sea level and spring came late in 1895. This caused typical farm problems that look to have blown up into larger issues. Some members wanted to make bylaws restricting others in their private matters. Town meetings became noisy and people on both sides lost interest. Many workers were lazy and did not contribute their share of the work.

In addition, William Reed used his influence as Superintendent of Agriculture to have the plot of land he donated to be improved by the work crews. Once they had done so, he used the arguments in the meetings as a pretext to demand the land back. The community leaders decided to do so to save on legal fees.

This in turn led other members of the community to demand their money back. The remaining portion of land was sold to pay those debts, leaving a single twenty dollar gold piece shared between Oliver Verity, George Allen and Frank Odell. They took that money and used it as a down payment on land for another experimental community called Home.

Bibliography;

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Tumwater Falls and Historical Park

Tumwater Falls

Tumwater Falls in Olympia Washington is an extremely underrated stop along I-5. Most people know of the old Olympia Brewing Companies’ empty brewery building that sits forlorn along the highway. Still others know of the older historic brewery building that is barely visible from the highway through the trees as I-5 curves around the Deschutes River and over Capitol Lake as it passes between the state capital of Olympia and the lesser known town of Tumwater.

Unfortunately very little points to the park as a destination. And so for many people, it’s just a stop with a couple of buildings and some trees.

Tumwater Falls

The new Olympic Brewing Company Building

City of Tumwater

The City of Tumwater was the first white settlement on Puget Sound. Michael T. Simmons led a party of 31 people north of the Columbia River to this point. They cut a wagon trail north from the Columbia River to this location. The party came north because one of the members was a mulatto man named George Bush. Oregon Territorial Las prohibited mulattos from living in the territory, but it was not enforced so far north.

Tumwater Falls

This wagon trail opened up the Puget Sound to settlement and the new town, New Market, acted as a supply depot and debarkation point for settlers across the region much like Oregon City acted for the state of Oregon. A grist mill was quickly built and a year later a sawmill. The name did not last long though, by 1863 the town was known as ‘Tumwater’ from Chinook Jargon for “waterfall.”

The Deschutes River with all three falls became a hub for a variety of industries from furniture mills to grist mills, saw mills, and eventually dams to produce power for commercial and residential needs throughout the area.

Middle Tumwater Falls

Middle Tumwater Falls

Tumwater Falls

Olympia Brewery

The most famous of these industries was the Capital Brewing Company, later the Olympia Brewing Company. Brewer Leopold F. Schmidt visited the Washington State Capital in Olympia in the Summer of 1895 as part of the Montana State Capital Commission to Washington. He and his brother Louis heard rumors of the artesian wells at Tumwater and toured them. The Daily Olympian reports on September 18, 1895 that they had purchased the property.

The new brewery was in business in 1896, just in time to capitalize on the Alaskan Gold Rush. His beer was so good and highly regarded that it cost twice as much as other beers along the west coast. A new brewery building was built in 1906. Amazingly, this build still stands today and is a picturesque site despite having been closed as a brewery in 1916 with the passing of Prohibition in Washington State.

The Second Olympia Brewery Building from Lower Tumwater Falls

The Second Olympia Brewery Building from Lower Tumwater Falls

1906 Olympia Brewery Building

Even now, the water is still amazing

When Prohibition was repealed in April of 1933, the Schmidt family opened a new, updated brewery on the property. They ran the brewery until 1983 when it was purchased by corporate interests. The building was finally closed in 2003, but as of late 2014 sounds like it might be redeveloped into a multi-use property. Including a brewery and brew pub.

The modern brewery building

The modern brewery building

the view from the brewery

the view from the brewery

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

The Olympia Brewery Company History Sign

The Olympia Brewery Company History Sign

Upper Tumwater Falls History Sign

Upper Tumwater Falls History Sign

Tumwater Historial Park

Two parks now showcase Capitol Lake, the Deschutes River, all three falls, a fish hatchery, and both Brewery Buildings. The Interpretive Park is maintained by the city and has two historic houses up at the main road.

But the gem is the Tumwater Historical Park built in 1962 by the Olympia Tumwater Foundation. The fifteen acre park spans all three waterfalls. An easy half mile trail follows both sides of the river, crossing it twice over two gorgeous bridges. In addition to a large selection of native shrubs the park, a fish hatchery helps bring salmon to the river. Multiple native species also call the park home.

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

Tumwater Falls Olympia Washington

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art

Downtown Vancouver, Washington has quite a bit of public art. Much of it is around the historic Esther Short Park.

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art
Taken during Kumoricon weekend, (the costumes) this is the Farmer’s market.

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art
This sculpture is not listed on the City of Vancouver’s site. I believe it’s around the corner from the park.

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art
The awesome fountain in the park. Kids like to play in the water when the sun is out.

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art
The Salmon Run Clock Tower. Two sides have brass salmon “swimming” up clock tower. It was funded by George Propstra, founder of local fast food chain, “Burgerville.”

Vancouver Washington Downtown Art
A customized statue of Captain George Vancouver. He never visited the area, but gave his name to both Vancouver Washington, and Vancouver B.C.