Fort Rock Geological Formation

Fort Rock is one Oregon’s geologic treasures. Created between 50,000 to 100,000 years ago from lava venting into the muddy bottom of what is now called Fort Rock Lake. The resulting steam explosion threw ash and basalt particles up into the air which rained down in a circular formation around the vent. The explosion also caused huge basalt blocks to thrust upwards. This is actually fairly common in central Oregon as about 40 of these formations exist as far north as John Day, Oregon.

The actual Fort Rock

The actual Fort Rock

The days of explosive lava are long over, but Continue reading

Peter Iredale at Fort Stevens

Peter Iredale at Fort Stevens

At the Oregon Coast. A sunny day.

Behold, what do we see. The poor remains of the gallant Peter Iredale.

A better, closer look. You can buy a poster or print of this picture here.

How she got here;

“On October 25, 1905, with an empty cargo hold and only 28 days out of Salina Cruz, Mexico, The Peter Iredale ran aground. Bound for Portland and a new load of cargo. Captain H. Lawrence offered his crew a bonus if they cut five days off the normal sailing time.

“Perfect sailing conditions allowed them to make good time, and the crew anticipated a rewarding voyage. Nearing their destination, they encountered a strong southwest storm. The captain gave the order to stand off the mouth of the Columbia. A few hours past midnight, the Peter Iredale was lost as a gust of wind pushed her into a surging mass of waves breaking on shore. The ship’s bottom raked the sand, crashing sections of the main mast, rigging, blocks, and tackle onto the deck. Tossed in the surf, the ship struck bottom for good, the remaining masts snapping as she came to rest.”

“Miraculously, no hands were lost during the thundering shower of rigging pounding the deck. The ship, however, was declared a total loss. For the most part, the wreck of the Peter Iredale was unremarkable, merely reflecting navigational problems in bad weather. Her fame came a popular attraction that lives on as a well-known landmark on the northern Oregon Coast.”

And why she’s important. (Not really, but any piece of education we can give is something.)

In 1960, there was some amount of controversy over the wreck, as an Oregon City man claimed his father had purchased the remains for salvage.

Peter Iredale at Fort Stevens

But after some litigation, and searching through public records, things turned out for the better, and the Peter Iredale remains a tourist destination for thousands of people every year.

Peter Iredale wreck at Sunset

Peter Iredale wreck at Sunset

Driftwood Stump

Portland’s Mountains

Taken from the top floor of the Red Lion Inn near Lloyd Center in Portland. They were taken through the windows of the hotel.

From North to South
Mt. St. Helens

Mt. St. Helens (with Mt. Rainier in the background when the weather is clear,)

Mt. Adams

Mt. Adams, kind of Portland’s forgotten mountain because it’s not seen very often from town. Usually you have to drive to Hood River to see it or even further east to The Dallas.

Mt. Hood

And lastly, Mt. Hood directly east of us. It looms over the city many days and can be seen from just about anywhere in town.

Not seen from here, but occasionally visible from Portland is Mt. Jefferson.

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest Sunrise

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest SunriseWallowa-Whitman National Forest Sunrise

After a weekend of visiting Ghost Towns in the area, notably Sumpter, Bourne, Granite, Cabell City and the Ah-Hee Diggings, we were dry camping in a huge field along an old logging road in the Wallowa-Whiteman National Forest.

Woken up by early morning birds, the distant snuffling of free range cattle, and the first peeks of sun rays into the tent, we got up early. This turned out to be pretty lucky as we got to watch the sun rise over the hills, deer wander along the sides of the road, and listen to rivers trickle over rocks.

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Klootchy Creek, Clatstop County, Oregon

Klootchy Creek, Clatstop County, Oregon

Before 2011 Klootchy Creek Park in Oregon was not specifically called out by name. Instead it was the “Largest Sitka Spruce in the World” wayside. A single lane bridge over the creek led one to a view, at the time, of the tallest Sitka Spruce Tree in the world.

Unfortunately over the past decade repeated disasters has cut the tree down to size. In 2006 a December wind storm caused a lightning damaged portion of the tree to fall. Almost exactly a year later, on December 2nd, 2007 a windstorm toppled the tree leaving only 80 feet of trunk.

Klootchy Creek, Clatstop County, Oregon

Klootchy Creek, Clatstop County, Oregon
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